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Easter Egg Safety

Easter Egg Safety

Coloring eggs for Easter can be a fun family tradition. However, if not handled correctly, eggs can be a health hazard. Follow these steps to make your Easter egg dying fun from coloring through the Easter egg hunt to eating the eggs.

Buying eggs

  • Buy eggs that are in a refrigerated case and are not cracked or broken
  • Then, get them home quickly and in the refrigerator immediately

Storing eggs

  • Keep eggs refrigerated at 40°F or cooler until needed
  • Store the eggs in the cartons they come from the store in to keep them from breaking and from absorbing odors from the other foods in the refrigerator
  • Keep the egg carton on a middle or lower shelf where the temperature changes less than in the door

Boiling the perfect Easter egg (American Egg Board recommendations)

  • Wash your hands before and after touching the eggs
  • Place eggs in a single layer in a saucepan
  • Cover the eggs with enough tap water to come at least one inch above the eggs
  • Cover the pan and quickly bring the water just to boiling
  • Turn off the heat and remove the pan from the burner to prevent further boiling
  • Let eggs stand, covered, in the hot water for 15 minutes
  • Immediately run cold water over the eggs or place them in ice water until completely cooled
  • Refrigerate the hard-boiled eggs in their cartons if you will not be using them right away

Coloring

  • Only color un-cracked eggs
  • If you plan to eat the colored eggs, use food coloring or dyes made for food
  • If an egg would crack while you are coloring it, throw it away
  • Make sure that the eggs do not stay out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours
  • Wash your hands before and after coloring the eggs

Easter egg hunts and decorations

  • Do not eat eggs that have been hidden or used as a decoration for more than 2 hours-Throw them out
  • Choose hiding places for eggs carefully-choose places where the eggs will not come in contact with dirt, pets, wild animals, birds, reptiles, insects or lawn chemicals
  • Place the eggs in the refrigerator immediately after they have been found
  • Wash your children's and your hands after handling the eggs

For more information on general egg safety visit::

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