»

Easter Egg Safety

Easter Egg Safety

Coloring eggs for Easter can be a fun family tradition. However, if not handled correctly, eggs can be a health hazard. Follow these steps to make your Easter egg dying fun from coloring through the Easter egg hunt to eating the eggs.

Buying eggs

  • Buy eggs that are in a refrigerated case and are not cracked or broken
  • Then, get them home quickly and in the refrigerator immediately

Storing eggs

  • Keep eggs refrigerated at 40°F or cooler until needed
  • Store the eggs in the cartons they come from the store in to keep them from breaking and from absorbing odors from the other foods in the refrigerator
  • Keep the egg carton on a middle or lower shelf where the temperature changes less than in the door

Boiling the perfect Easter egg (American Egg Board recommendations)

  • Wash your hands before and after touching the eggs
  • Place eggs in a single layer in a saucepan
  • Cover the eggs with enough tap water to come at least one inch above the eggs
  • Cover the pan and quickly bring the water just to boiling
  • Turn off the heat and remove the pan from the burner to prevent further boiling
  • Let eggs stand, covered, in the hot water for 15 minutes
  • Immediately run cold water over the eggs or place them in ice water until completely cooled
  • Refrigerate the hard-boiled eggs in their cartons if you will not be using them right away

Coloring

  • Only color un-cracked eggs
  • If you plan to eat the colored eggs, use food coloring or dyes made for food
  • If an egg would crack while you are coloring it, throw it away
  • Make sure that the eggs do not stay out of the refrigerator for more than 2 hours
  • Wash your hands before and after coloring the eggs

Easter egg hunts and decorations

  • Do not eat eggs that have been hidden or used as a decoration for more than 2 hours-Throw them out
  • Choose hiding places for eggs carefully-choose places where the eggs will not come in contact with dirt, pets, wild animals, birds, reptiles, insects or lawn chemicals
  • Place the eggs in the refrigerator immediately after they have been found
  • Wash your children's and your hands after handling the eggs

For more information on general egg safety visit::

News & Notices

Scott County Health Department to Host Event to Celebrate National Public Health Week April 2 - 6 is National Public Health Week! The theme of National Public Health Week 2018 is "Changing Our Future Together.” The Scott County Health Department (SCHD) is kicking off its celebration by hosting an...
Posted: April 2, 2018
Join Scott County Health Department for a free open house to celebrate National Public Health Week! Thursday, April 5, 2018 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Scott County Administrative Center, First Floor Boardroom 600 W. 4th Street Davenport, Iowa 52801 You can expect: Welcome from Ed Rivers, Health...
Posted: March 21, 2018
The American Journal of Public Health, a publication of the American Public Health Association, has gathered a number of studies on gun violence, including studies on concealed firearm permits, safe gun storage, hospitalizations from firearm injuries, and mental illness and mass shootings. This...
Posted: March 8, 2018